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SA Marine Protected Area's Page

Check here for updates on the Marine Parks Bill and South Australian MPA news.

 

mp21/10/2012 - Fishers For Conservation Comment regarding the 19 SA Marine Parks Draft Management Plans. - the need for recreation zones.

"Recreation zones are Fishers For Conservation's recommended solution to the problem of buffering sanctuary zones. Recreation zones are also recommended as a solution for zoning in high recreational use areas that nonetheless deserve higher levels of protection."

 

 

mp10/07/2012 - SA government releases marine park zones - A map showing all of the proposed Marine Parks Zoning has been released. The Environment minister also said that "Draft management plans for each marine park, including the proposed zoning, will be released for public review in the near future".

The Map is available here and stored on our server here (pdf)

More maps here

Media:

SA govt releases marine park zones Sky News - "South Australia's 19 marine parks will allow a wide range of activities, including commercial and recreational fishing, Environment Minister Paul Caica says. The state government today released the full set of proposed zones for the marine parks after announcing a series of smaller sanctuary zones in April. The sanctuary areas, which cover about six per cent of SA waters, will essentially be no-go zones for fishing." Read More

Final proposal released on new SA marine zoning ABC - "SA Environment Minister Paul Caica said the state's 19 marine parks were vital to preserving ecosystems and marine life. "What it clearly shows through these maps is that we're providing ongoing opportunities for community and industry as well as conservation," he said." read more

SA govt releases marine park zones Herald Sun (AAP) - COMMERCIAL and recreational fishing will be allowed in parts of South Australia's 19 marine parks, Environment Minister Paul Caica says. Access All Areas - Digital Pass The state government on Tuesday released the full set of proposed zones for the marine parks after announcing a series of smaller sanctuary zones in April. The sanctuary areas, which cover about six per cent of SA waters, will essentially be no-go zones for fishing....read more

 

26/02/2011 - Marine Parks – are we missing the point?

This article examines the Marine Parks debate raging in Australia today. An experienced fisher and marine scientist asks the question – are we missing the point?

If you are a fisher in SA or anywhere in Australia please read this article by one of FFC's founding members.

 

mp05/02/11 - SA marine Parks, Where is the process at?

The Department of Environment and Natural Heritage has developed a new corporate website, with a special section for marine conservation - including marine parks. The new marine park home page will still be accessible via this URL: www.marineparks.sa.gov.au.

The sanctuary zones 'scenarios' map has finally been released as a single map covering the whole state, download here. Thanks to those who have provided feedback to Email: fisherfc@internode.on.net so far. FFC belives in fair and equitable access for fishers and protection to ensure our fishing future.

From the website: Two phases of community engagement - Planning for the introduction of zoning arrangements within South Australia's 19 marine parks has entered the important first part of a two-stage process.

Phase 1: gathering information Between November 15 and 22, preliminary sanctuary zone scenarios were released to marine park local advisory groups (MPLAGs) as discussion starters for informal information gathering via MPLAGs, information from community members and ongoing meetings with sectoral interests. This process will take a few months. MPLAGs and other stakeholders will advise the Government on their preferred zoning scenarios in the first half of 2011. Changes to the potential zoning scenarios will be further discussed at the fourth round of MPLAG meetings, which are expected to be held across South Australia in February 2011.

Phase 2: public consultation Once the Government has received advice on preferred zoning scenarios from the community and other stakeholders, this advice will be carefully considered when draft management plans with zoning for the 19 multiple-use marine parks are developed. The draft marine park management plans will be released for formal, statewide consultation in the second half of 2011. Final zoning arrangements are due to be implemented in 2012.

 

119/1/11 SA Marine Parks - new report released - More Than Fishy Business by Dr Melissa Nursey-Bray.

The University of Adelaide's Dr. Melissa Nursey-Bray has this morning published a report that has reviewed over 350 scientific and social studies on existing marine parks.

The report examines marine parks from an economic and environmental perspective. The report demonstrates that marine sanctuary zones act as effective fisheries management tools as well as providing comprehensive conservation outcomes.

"This review provides an international overview of the design, principles, socio-economic conditions, and different models for MPAs. While it is acknowledged that the benefits of MPAs occur for many sectors and industries, this review explicitly highlights the benefits of MPAs to fishing."

The report can be found here: http://adelaide.academia.edu/MelissaNurseyBray/Papers/393942/More_than_Fishy_Business_A_Literature_Review_of_marine_parks

Or download PDF here.

The report presents case studies in a plain English format and will act as an easy reference guide to help communicate the benefits of sanctuary zones using real life examples!

 

Update November 2010

Draft zoning arrangements for the SA marine parks are now available. View the SA Marine Park outer boundaries Here and the new maps showing possible sanctuary zones at http://marineparkssa.ning.com/page/local-advisory-groups - download the 'scenario map' for your local area and you will get an idea where the no fishing areas may be and a brief explanation of the rationale behind each high protection zone.

Fishers For Conservation has had a look at a few of the maps and we have not yet identified any potential zones in locations which would stop the average angler from being able get to, or on, the water and have a fish. It looks a lot like these zoning's are trying to be a non-offensive as possible and there is a genuine possibility that in some cases they will be too small to be effective. On a positive note known spawning areas and nursery habitat is included in some of the sanctuary zones.

We maintain our position that Sanctuary zones should be buffered (surrounded), and complemented by recreation zones where only non-commercial activity is allowed, though there is still no provision in the marine parks Act for this to occur.

We value your feedback - please let us know about what you think and any sanctuary zone proposals that you believe unfairly restricts your ability to fish or fails to protect important fish spawning or nursery areas. Email: fisherfc@internode.on.net

The Government has released a 'fact sheet' designed to address the concerns of recreational fishers - "Most fishers agree that a healthy marine environment is essential to the future of their fishing. Marine parks play an important role in protecting the health of the marine environment now and into the future, and will help protect habitats that are important to the lifecycles of fish species targeted by recreational fishers."

The science of marine parks technical report is available here

 

Update March 2010 Community involvement in Marine Parks planning

In 2009, the South Australian Government created 19 marine parks along the State’s coastline. These new marine parks are needed to help ensure our marine habitats, plants and animals survive in the face of predicted population growth and environmental challenges including climate change. They will also help sustain our recreational and commercial activities for generations to come.

At the start of 2010, 13 Local Advisory Groups (LAGs) were set up to help the development of marine park management plans and zoning.  LAG meetings began in February and will continue during 2010.  At these meetings community members, conservationists, recreational fishers, commercial seafood operators, the Government and other stakeholders share information about the State’s marine environment. You are welcome to come along and observe LAG meetings. Meeting dates and locations are published online at www.marineparks.sa.gov.au and advertised in local newspapers. 

An important part of the LAGs’ work is to help collect local information, which is essential to their consideration of management and zoning suggestions.  That’s why it’s important you also contribute information about your own local activities and knowledge. LAG members and marine park planners need to know where people fish, dive, go boating or think the marine environment needs protecting.  That way, when zoning concepts are developed they will be based on as much real-world information as possible.

To help you participate in the marine park process, a community mapping tool has been developed called SAMPIT (South Australia’s Marine Parks Information Tool).  You can use SAMPIT to map your favorite spots for fishing, boating or places you think need conservation.  This information will then be used by LAGs and marine park planners to develop suggestions for future marine park management and zoning.  You can logon to SAMPIT on the internet at www.marineparks.sa.gov.au  Instructions for using SAMPIT are below.  If you prefer, a printable version of SAMPIT can be downloaded from www.marineparks.sa.gov.au

Or phone 1800 006 120 and ask the marine parks team to post you a copy.

How to use SAMPIT (South Australia’s Marine Parks Information Tool)

SAMPIT is a simple step-by-step process designed to help you participate in the creation of South Australia’s marine parks.

You can use SAMPIT to map your favorite spots for fishing, boating or places you think need environmental protection.

This information will help the community and the Government work together to agree where marine park zones should go.

This information will be used by Local Advisory Groups to develop suggestions for future marine park management, including zoning.

To use SAMPIT on the internet

2. Fill in your contact details.

3. Select your activity OR identify areas of conservation value.

4. Select a marine park.

5. When the map has zoomed onto the park, select the areas where you enjoy a particular activity.

6. You can also use SAMPIT to identify areas you believe have conservation value.

7. When finished: Select another activity OR select another marine park OR save and exit.

8. If you make a mistake, you can delete the relevant activity.

Would you like a printed copy?  A printable version of SAMPIT can be downloaded from www.marineparks.sa.gov.au

Or phone 1800 006 120 and ask the marine parks team to post you a copy.

 

Update 2010 : Proposal for the Nuyts Archipelago and the Investigator Group of Islands to become Wilderness Protection Areas.

With the Marine Parks legislation having recently passed through the SA Parliament and the Marine Park outer boundaries having just been declared (which include all the Island areas) it is proposed that the islands be protected under the Wilderness Protection Act and the surrounding waters under the Marine Parks Act.

In Environment Minister Jay Weatherill’s words…

Spreading south across the remote waters of South Australia’s western coastline are the Nuyts Archipelago and the Investigator Group of Islands. Generations of isolation mean that these islands have not suffered from the damage that can occur from the introduction of predators and other species.

They are home to some of South Australia’s most endangered species – the Australian Sea Lion, Pearson Island Black Footed Rock Wallaby, White Bellied Sea Eagle and Osprey.

Wilderness protection for these areas will help to protect our native species from continuing threats – altered landscapes, growing resource use and climate change.It is also an opportunity for us to create better links between land and sea...

There is now a 3 month public consultation period during which you can send in a submission in support of the proposal. Submissions are due by 5 February 2010, the proposal can be found at:
http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/parks/pdfs/nuyts-wilderness-assess-report.pdf

Send submissions to:

Manager, Policy and Planning
Department for Environment and Heritage
GPO Box 1047
Adelaide South Australia 5001
Or email: jason.irving@sa.gov.au

Update Spring 2008: Latest govt newletter http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/coasts/marineparks/pdfs/mp_newsletter.pdf

Government website:

http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/coasts/marineparks.html

Update June 2008The Marine Parks Council of South Australia was appointed on 22 May 2008.

The Council will provide advice to the Minister for Environment and Conservation, Hon Jay Weatherill MP, on a range of economic and social issues relating to South Australia's marine parks.

Marine Parks Council

The Marine Parks Council includes:

  • Susan Stovell (community affairs) - Presiding Member
  • Prof Anthony Cheshire (marine science) - Deputy Presiding Member
  • Christian Pyke (commercial fishing)
  • Hagen Stehr AO (aquaculture)
  • Trevor Watts (recreational fishing)
  • Peter Owen (marine conservation)
  • Michelle Grady (marine conservation)
  • Peri Coleman (marine conservation)
  • Dr Hazel Lindsay (marine science)
  • Parry Agius (indigenous culture)
  • Leanne Burch (departmental representative)

The first meeting of the Marine Parks Council of South Australia was held on 23 June 2008.

 

Update January 2008: The Department has put out the call for nominations for the Marine Parks Council.

The following is an xcerpt from the Govt website http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/coasts/marineparks.html

The Government of South Australia is now inviting expressions of interest from members of the public for membership of the Marine Parks Council of South Australia (see advertisement (available in site). The Council will play an important role in the development and management of South Australia's marine parks by providing independent advice to the Minister for Environment and Conservation, Hon Gail Gago MLC on a range of environmental, economic and social issues relating to the parks. The Council will consist of 10 members appointed by the Governor, on the nomination of the Minister, and the Chief Executive of DEH (or his/her nominee) as an ex officio member. Of the 10 members:* 1 must be a person who has knowledge of, or experience in, the field of commercial fishing; * 1 must be a person who has knowledge of, or experience in, the field of aquaculture; * 1 must be a person who has knowledge of, or experience in, the field of recreational fishing; * 3 must be persons who have knowledge of, or experience in, the field of marine conservation; * 2 must be persons who have qualifications or experience in a field of science that is relevant to the marine environment; * 1 must be a person who has extensive involvement in community affairs; and * 1 must be a person who has extensive knowledge of indigenous culture, especially in connection with the marine environment.

Each person appointed to the Council must be a person who can demonstrate knowledge of, or an interest in, the requirements necessary to manage the marine environment in a responsible manner. Expressions of interest for the Council close on Friday, 25 January 2008 and should be sent to: Mr Chris Thomas A/Manager, Coast and Marine Conservation Department for Environment and Heritage GPO Box 1047 Adelaide SA 5001 For more information on the Council please refer to our Marine Parks Council of South Australia Information Sheet (100Kb PDF).

Update November 2007: The Marine Parks Bill has passed through both houses of Parliament with some minor amendments. A partnership between the commercial fishing industry and environmental groups lobbying MP's from both sides of the house lead to some amendments providing for greater certainty for both industry and environmental outcomes. This spirit of co-operation between fishing industry groups and environmental groups is very positive and gives us hope that the SA Marine Parks process can result in a comprehensive system of marine protected areas that can be embraced by, and have clear benefits for, fishers - both recreational and commercial, environmentalists and of course all other marine users.

FFC looks forward to being involved in the upcoming processes of consultation on Marine Park outer boundaries and then within park area zoning (including the placement of no fishing areas) and other aspects of management plans.

An FFC Information sheet on Marine Parks and recreational fishing in SA is under development as part of out Community Based Sustainable Recreational Fishing Education Project and will be available very soon.

Update August 2007: The Marine Parks Bill has been tabled and is likely to be debated in parliament next month. The Department For the Environment and Heritage has sent a mail out to stakeholders providing background on the process. Download and read the letter to stakeholders (Word doc.)

An article has also been written for Southern Fisheries Magazine summarising background and frequently asked questions regarding the SA Marine Parks Process. To read the article click here (pdf.)

The letter to stakeholders identifies the major changes to Revised Bill tabled in parliament from the Draft Marine Parks Bill that was released for public comment as:

  • incorporating resilience to climate change into the objects of the Bill;
  • including a consultation period on marine park boundaries of not less than six weeks;
  • legislating the need to consult with a representative of all signatories to an Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA) or Native Title claim when preparing marine park management plans;
  • including a three year time-frame to develop marine park management plans once the boundaries are proclaimed; and
  • increasing the minimum public consultation period on marine park management plans, from 28 days to six weeks.

And lists the next steps in the process as:

  • Finalise the Marine Parks Act
  • Release marine park boundaries for public comment
  • Establish marine park consultative committees
  • Seek community input to develop marine park management plans
  • Prepare draft marine park management plans (including zoning maps) for public comment
  • Implement marine park management plans
  • Manage any displaced commercial fishing and/or aquaculture effort
  • Ongoing management of marine parks

Update June 2007: Budget announcement of funding for Marine Parks program, indications that the Marine Parks Bill may actually be tabled in parliament soon.

- Excerpt from press release by Hon KEVIN FOLEY MP Deputy Premier Treasurer Minister for Industry and Trade Minister for Federal/State Relations:

"An investment of $4.152 million over the next four years to develop 19 new marine parks across State waters is the centerpiece of the Rann Government’s commitment to conservation in this year’s State Budget. Treasurer Kevin Foley says $1 million from this allocation will be spent in 2007-08, bringing total marine park spending to $3 million next financial year. "

Meanwhile Minister Gail Gago (environment Minister) has said in speeches that the Marine Parks bill will "soon" be tabled in parliament. The Minister has expressed concern about the bill traversing the upper house and there are concerns that the mining and commercial fishing lobby will influence opposition and independent MP's to 'water down' the protection afforded by the legislation. This despite clear and worrying major concessions already having been given to these powerful interest groups in the draft legislation.

The process for the introduction of SA's future Marine Parks is expected to be: 1. passing of Marine Parks Bill through parliament, 2. declaration of Encounter Marine Park, 3. declaration of boundaries for the other 18 Marine Parks (government target is to have these in place by 2010) 4. consultation and zoning of marine parks.

Fishers For Conservation will be engaging in all 4 of the above stages, educating, supporting and representing fishers with a genuine interest in marine protection and fishing for the future.

Main themes for FFC engagement are likely to include:

Ensuring that enough of the critical habitats that support biodiversity and hence fisheries are protected from destructive processes such as indiscriminate commercial net and trawl fishing.

Ensuring that equitable and adequate access to recreational fishing opportunities is allowed for in the zoning, in particular for shore based and small boat fishers without access to deep water fishing opportunities (no repeats of the Victor Harbor inshore sanctuary zoning debacle), while also striking the right balance of sanctuary zones covering critical habitat, including nursery and spawning grounds, to protect and enhance marine ecosystem health, biological diversity and fishing.

Update May 2007: No sign of the introduction of the Marine parks bill into parliament. No indication of the extent to which public submissions on the draft legislation will be taken into account in any bill tabled. A frustrated fishing industry, department and public waiting to help ensure sustainable fishing and healthy marine environments into the future.

Below: information on the SA marine parks bill circa. November 2006

The DEH deadline for written public submissions was 30th Nov 2006, the bill will not be considered by parliament until the next sitting well into the new year. Below is background regarding the SA marine parks bill.

Guide to writing a submission

Download FFC Submission regarding the marine parks bill (Word format)

Will this legislation succeed in providing a secure future for our marine environment and the people who enjoy it? What's the legislation all about? Read this summary (.pdf format 427 kb) prepared by CCSA. Have your say - read our guide to making a submission on the Draft Bill. Or download a printable version (32kb Word format).

Draft Marine Parks Bill 2006 - Launch and background information

On 1 September 2006, the Minister for Environment and Conservation, Hon Gail Gago MLC, formally released the draft Marine Parks Bill 2006 for public consultation. The draft Marine Parks Bill provides a legislative framework for the dedication, zoning and management of South Australia's marine parks. The State Government has committed to developing 19 new marine parks within State waters by 2010. In conjunction with the draft Marine Parks Bill, the Department for Environment and Heritage (DEH) has developed a range of supporting materials including explanatory notes, an overview paper and information on the management of any displaced commercial fishing and aquaculture effort, which are available to download:

Download Draft Marine Parks Bill 2006 (400Kb PDF)
Download Explanatory Notes (100Kb PDF)
Download Overview Paper (50Kb PDF)
Download paper on Marine Parks and Commercial Fishing (50Kb PDF)
Download paper on Marine Parks and Aquaculture (50Kb PDF)

For more information on the draft Marine Parks Bill and the supporting information, please refer to the Legislation page.

Have your say!

The South Australian Government is now inviting all members of the community to have their say on the draft Marine Parks Bill 2006. Your views and comments are important to us and you are encouraged to make a written submission. A Submission Form (50Kb PDF) is available. Alternatively, you can submit your written comments to DEH via mail (reply paid - no stamp required), fax or e-mail as follows:

Draft Marine Parks Bill 2006 Submissions
Coast and Marine Conservation Branch
Department for Environment and Heritage
Reply Paid 1047
Adelaide SA 5001
Australia

Fax: (61 8) 8124 4920
E-mail: marineDEH@saugov.sa.gov.au

Submissions must be received by 30th November 2006

Guide to writing a submission regarding the Draft Marine Parks Bill

DEH have prepared a submission form for use by the public but it is not necessary to use this, comments will be accepted in any format. Download Draft Marine Parks Bill Submission Form (50Kb PDF).

It is important to note that the Draft Bill does not refer to the location of proposed marine parks or the zoning within them, you will have your chance to have your say on this down the track but feel free to make comments at this stage if you like.

Some hints when writing a submission:

  1. Explain who you are, where you live and what your main interests regarding the Marine Parks Bill are. Eg. “I am a recreational fisher with .. years experience fishing the States’ waters and especially the …. area where I live. I am concerned that the Draft Marine Parks Bill will not provide adequate protection for fish stocks and other marine life from threats such as of unsustainable commercial fishing and mining.”
  2. Outline what you like about the Marine Parks Bill – eg. Point out that you support marine conservation initiatives and understand that spatial management of the marine environment is one of the measures needed as part of ecologically based management of the marine environment to ensure biodiversity conservation and the opportunity for fishing for future generations.
  3. Make recommendations regarding what can be done to improve the Draft Bill (refer to the FFC recommendations below for some ideas – don’t forget to mention Recreation Zones).
  4. State that you would like to be kept up to date on future developments regarding Marine Parks and marine conservation

FFC recommends that you address some or all of the following points when writing your submission:

Recreation Zones:
The draft legislation allows for only 5 zonings - general use, habitat protection, sanctuary, restricted access and special purpose (see the draft encounter marine park for details of the activities currently envisaged for each zone). This allows no provision for recreation zones allowing recreational pursuits without commercial exploitation. Recreation zones must be an option for marine park planners to provide increased conservation outcomes without excessively restricting access to the public for recreational purposes (including recreational fishing). Elsewhere such as in NSW Recreational Fishing Havens (RFH’s) excluding commercial fishing have proven popular, economically valuable and have delivered biodiversity conservation outcomes. SA’s Marine Parks need provision for similar commercial activity free areas. For more details on the need for recreation zones in Marine Park planning read here.

Marine Park Zoning:
The zoning arrangements for SA’s marine parks are not adequately addressed in the legislation leaving too much up to the government of the day. The legislation outlines the names of the 5 zones that will be included in SA marine parks without giving any indication of what they will mean in practical terms or what they are supposed to achieve. The purpose and activities allowed in each management zone must be included in the legislation to give certainty to marine users and to ensure that future governments do not erode protection. Under the proposed Bill, all the zones (multiple-use) will have the same set of objectives, meaning that there will be no legislative rationale for what is permitted in each zone. The Bill needs to be amended so that the types of management zones and the objects of each of the zones are defined.

Lack of an independent advisory group:
The Bill does not establish an independent advisory committee - such a committee is required to ensure conservation outcomes independent of the political whims of the day. Committees like the Marine Advisory Committee or stakeholder reference groups do not have the permanence or independence of a statutory committee. Such a committee would have to permanence and autonomy to make decisions based on scientific evidence, conservation outcomes and the public good and not based on short-term vote buying or industry party campaign contributions.

Lack of certainty regarding enforcement:
The bill provides many options for who will enforce Marine Park regulations and a framework for enforcement and dispute resolution. Certainty must be provided within the bill regarding the provision of adequate funding and resources for effective education and enforcement of Marine Park regulations. Are we legislating for a system of ‘paper parks’ that will be ignored by commercial fishers and others?

Community nomination process:
The Bill makes noises about community nominations of Parks and DEH staff assure that there is provision for community nominations. Reading the fine print this process will only be initiated if the Minister of the day feels like it, and there is no established process or timeline for assessment of any community nominations should they ever actually be called for. An amendment to establish a statutory process for dealing with community nominations of Marine Parks is required.

 

Summary:

Recreation zones must be an option for marine park planners to provide increased conservation outcomes without excessively restricting access to the public for recreational purposes (including recreational fishing).

The purpose and activities allowed in each management zone must be included in the legislation.

The Bill needs to be amended so that the types of management zones and the objects of each of the zones are defined.

The Bill does not establish an independent advisory committee - such a committee is required to ensure conservation outcomes independent of the political whims of the day.

Certainty must be provided within the Bill regarding the provision of adequate funding and resources for effective education and enforcement of Marine Park regulations.

An amendment to establish a statutory process for dealing with community nominations of Marine Parks is required.

The Draft Legislation and the need for Recreation Zones

S.A.'s Marine Parks draft legislation has been released

Having had time to read the Draft Marine Parks bill Fishers For Conservation has concerns that an opportunity for the general community, and in particular recreational fishers, to take stewardship of our marine parks could be being overlooked. The draft bill leaves too much up to regulations yet to be presented and fails to outline in law the actual purpose or rules that will be applied to the zones within our 'multiple use' marine parks.

Importantly there is no provision for recreation zones that allow only non commercial activities. Such recreation zones would have many benefits including:

  • Recreation Zones would be the ideal way to buffer Sanctuary (no extractive use) zones from commercial impacts - current proposed zoning allows long line boats to spend all day circling sanctuary zones that are likely to be too small to allow for protection of many fish species.
  • Recreation Zones would benefit local and state tourism and recreation related economy, the area lost to commercial fishing can be compensated for using the detailed displaced effort compensation plan that DEH have already released. Where is the plan/document outlining how MPA's will address displaced recreational effort?
  • Recreation Zones will have considerable conservation value, by removing commercial impacts from areas they will become the second most protected large zones within our marine parks and significantly increase the conservation value of Marine Parks. In NSW after the introduction of RFH's (Recreational Fishing Havens), where commercial effort has been removed by a rec fishing licence funded commercial licence buyback, fishers are reporting vastly improved catches and observing increased species diversity.
  • The addition of Recreation Zones to the current zonings allowed for in the Marine Parks bill is the incentive that recreational fishers need to take intellectual ownership of our marine parks. Zones for recreational pursuits only will be the reward and the compensation for displaced effort required to bring all of the recreational fishing community behind the much needed marine conservation initiative that MPA's are.
  • Recreation Zones are not just for rec fishers, these zones will be areas where all who love our marine environment can enjoy recreational pursuits without direct impacts from commercial operations.
  • Recreation Zones will provide opportunities for research into the impact of recreational fishing and will allow for areas with fishing regulations that may vary from the general rules such as catch and release only areas, seasonal spatial general or species fishing closures, reduced bag limits or tackle restrictions. In short Recreation Zones will be designed to maximise the economic and social benefits of recreational fishing while minimising the impact on Marine Park areas.

Recreation Zones will be appropriate to buffer sanctuary zones and for areas adjacent to population creatures or with a long history of recreational use.

Upgrading some of the area that would be zoned 'habitat protection' under the current thinking would provide tangible conservation value for our Marine Packs and real economic and social benefits to the community. Can we afford to enshrine in law a zoning framework that does not allow for recreation only areas within our Marine Parks?

So get along to your local Marine Parks information session and let your support for recreation zones be known and write a submission - let your voice be heard.